Experience

How CPOs should navigate employee experience in the months ahead

Bianca Buckridee
2 minute read
Bianca Buckridee
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This is the second post in our series of what digital leaders should consider as they navigate the scale, pace and actions required to steer their org back in the new normal. A paramount concern for every organization during the pandemic was their workforce: were they doing enough for their people and providing the right support for them, and their families, to work effectively during chaos? It seemed like the workplace changed overnight, from cubicle farms and open offices to virtual meetings with furry friends and tiny humans popping in to demand treats. Amidst all of the change and even with remaining uncertainty, it’s clear that many executives realize the imperative to demonstrate supportive actions to show how they care for their people.

As we think about what returning to the office looks like, CPOs will be tackling significant questions:

  • What did we do well to make our people feel cared for and supported?
  • What weaknesses were exposed in our employee experience journey map?
  • What lessons did we learn the hard way about how our leaders communicated changes?
  • Who demonstrated better practices about collaborating that we could learn from?

Other questions for key processes as CPOs re-calibrate planning and strategies:

Culture

  • Connectivity: did we empower leaders to build in moments to connect to each other?
  • Progress: Was company culture disrupted, how do we re-cultivate any sense of disconnect?

Agility

  • Pulse-Checks: how do we use technology to understand where we need to take action most urgently?
  • Collaboration: how do we re-configure communications processes for teams to have check-ins to keep ongoing work in progress and spark new ideas?

New Working Paradigms

  • For Managers: did we provide enough knowledge, guidance and tools for managers to be understanding of new work environments and to check in on their people?
  • For Employees: did we provide tools and ways for employees to be understanding of shifts in work environments and to check in on each other?
  • For the Business: how do we use technology to empower productivity when our workforce has competing priorities in remote environments?

Someday we’ll return to the physical office, or maybe not. One thing cannot be overstated no matter the size of your organization: the human element. During a crisis, people will look to each other for support and steadfastly support the growth of those who stood by them. Leaders who get this also genuinely care about purpose and as we emerge from uncertainty into a new normal, their people will not only shine, they will thrive.

To read more in this series: 

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These postings are my own and do not necessarily represent BMC's position, strategies, or opinion.

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About the author

Bianca Buckridee

Bianca Buckridee

Bianca Buckridee is a solutions marketing manager at BMC, where she is responsible for developing marketing strategy and messaging for Digital Workplace, Digital Service, and the BMC Chatbot. Buckridee previously led Social Media Operations at JPMorgan Chase and SunTrust, where she pioneered new customer service experiences and built the operational and technological model to interact with customers via Twitter and Facebook. In addition to building a social media command center, she created a new cross line of business data intelligence model to gather voice of the customer reporting. She’s also taught kindergarten and third grade proving there is no challenge she won’t accept.