I do not accept that Service Desk tools are a commodity

Stacks of boxes in a large warehose

Some commentators say that the IT Support toolset market is commoditized.

I don’t accept it. Here are many reasons why:

  • I won’t accept that support tools are a commodity while any customer waits days for something to get resolved when, with a bit of guidance, they could have resolved it themselves.
  • I won’t accept that support tools are a commodity while customers have to report issues to the Service Desk, which could have been detected, diagnosed and resolved automatically before anyone felt their impact.
  • I won’t accept that support tools are a commodity if any major outage ever overwhelms a Service Desk with calls, because customers weren’t informed quickly enough.
  • I won’t accept that support tools are a commodity if any customer ever feels the need to make another call, just to find out what happened about their first call.
  • I won’t accept that support tools are a commodity if any agent ever has to interrupt a customer in mid-flow just to “take a few details first”, because the form they’re filling in forces them to do that.
  • I won’t accept that support tools are a commodity when any Service Desk agent tells a customer “I’ll just have to put you on-hold for one moment”.
  • I won’t accept that support tools are a commodity while Service Desk carpets have tell-tale criss-cross tracks made by agents scooting their chairs to experienced colleagues’ desks (resulting in two customers being put “on-hold for one moment”) to ask for guidance.
  • I won’t accept that support tools are a commodity while I still encounter “shadow knowledge bases” on Service Desks.
  • I won’t accept that support tools are a commodity if any second or third-line team ever irritably bounces a ticket straight back to the Service Desk because it needn’t have come to them.
  • I won’t accept that support tools are a commodity while agents feel the need NOT to search for the resources that might get them a first-time fix, simply because at that moment they are more worried about their call-handling-time target.
  • I won’t accept that support tools are a commodity if tickets still bounce between six different support teams, until someone finally drags them all into one room to actually talk together.
  • I won’t accept that support tools are a commodity until everyone working remotely has all the resources on their mobile device, rather than having to waste time powering up their laptop and finding a network connection.
  • I won’t accept that support tools are a commodity while Service Desk managers tell me it takes six months to get new recruits up-to-speed, only for them to leave after eighteen.
  • Simply, I won’t accept that support tools are a commodity while there are still customers who could be served better if the people serving them have a better tool.

A market is not commoditized just because lots of people have internalised its problems, and regard them as normal. It is certainly not commoditized just because there are a lot of tools that don’t do enough to help people.

This is why we won’t stop innovating.

Come and see the new Remedy at BMC Engage.  You’ll see how BMC is working to change users’ expectations, with the most powerful, intelligent, user-focused support tool ever.

These postings are my own and do not necessarily represent BMC's position, strategies, or opinion.

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Jon Hall

Jon Hall

Lead Product Manager in the BMC Remedy ITSM Product Management team at BMC Software, focused particularly on the evolving toolset marketplace and innovative new solutions for service. 18 years in ITSM.