Comments on: Docker 101: An Introduction http://www.bmc.com/blogs/docker-101-introduction/ BMC Software Tue, 03 Nov 2015 23:59:00 +0000 hourly 1 By: Charles T. Betz http://www.bmc.com/blogs/docker-101-introduction/#comment-242 Wed, 03 Jun 2015 13:27:00 +0000 http://www.bmc.com/blogs/?p=8310#comment-242 Great observation Jon. Here is a fantastic detailed study on current security vulnerabilities in Docker images: http://t.co/UqW2tgMPee

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By: Jon Hall http://www.bmc.com/blogs/docker-101-introduction/#comment-241 Wed, 27 May 2015 18:16:00 +0000 http://www.bmc.com/blogs/?p=8310#comment-241 There are unofficial images on Docker Hub for some pretty big commercial applications. For example, I found one for Oracle Database Enterprise Edition. That’s pretty scary for software asset managers, particularly as you could easily end up liable for licensing every CPU core on the entire physical infrastructure on which those containers can run.

There are also quite a few official builds from the likes of IBM on Docker Hub. These often require acceptance of a developer license, but that acceptance is driven simply by setting an environment variable to “accept”!

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By: Greggory Tucker http://www.bmc.com/blogs/docker-101-introduction/#comment-231 Tue, 28 Apr 2015 17:35:00 +0000 http://www.bmc.com/blogs/?p=8310#comment-231 Nice catch, Charlie, of some aspects of container usage that I hadn’t considered. I have used Vagrant, and I know the default boxes are probably safe, but the technology does make it easy to add boxes from uncontrolled sources that contain licensing land mines. One of my customers has a blanket prohibition of all open source and shareware software. In one case of a very minor utility they found a license provision covering all revenues earned by the company.

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